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You’ve updated your CV, aced the job interview and landed yourself a job offer. You might think the hard part was over, but there’s a lot of talent in how to best negotiate a job offer. Here at Carrot our recruiters will help you understand what would be a reasonable request when discussing the terms of a job so we’ve put together our top tips for nailing a job offer that keeps both sides of the contract happy.

Money...

Your new employer will probably go in with a low offer, so it wouldn’t be unreasonable to ask for an increase. Be realistic though - you’re not very likely to get an extra £10,000. However, if the employer reckons you’re the right fit and can envisage the revenue you’ll bring to the company, it might be worth their while to agree to a small increase without much to-ing and fro-ing between the two parties.

...it’s not the be all and end all

Yes, money makes the world go round, but if the pay isn’t quite as high as you were looking for that shouldn’t mean you dismiss the offer straight away. Going for a similar or lower salary than you’re currently on might benefit you in the long run – the new job might offer you more in the way of development and progression further down the line than you’re current employer. It’s also worthwhile taking into account any bonuses and benefits, as these added up could easily take you over your current salary.

Be likeable

The hiring manager is more likely to agree to your terms for the contract if they like you and will make how you negotiate the job offer easier. Going through a recruiter means you won’t be dealing with the hiring manager personally, but they will get an idea of your personality and working etiquette through the requests you make. It’s therefore important to ensure you don’t do anything during the negotiation process to make them change their opinion of you. You should feel confident to ask for what you deserve, but without coming across as greedy or arrogant.

Be understanding

No matter how much the company loves you, some people simply can’t budge on their offer due to constraints at their end. For example, if you’ve been offered a job for a large company who are employing 10 people at the same time, they’re very unlikely to offer you a higher salary than the other 9 people starting in the same or similar role. However, being a large company, they may be more likely to offer you a pay review sooner, and could be more flexible on start times and holiday dates. Smaller companies are more likely to negotiate your salary, but might be stricter when it comes to flexible working hours or the date you’re due to start.

Get everything out in the open at once

If you do feel you need to negotiate several parts of your offer, it’s best to lay all your cards on the table at once. If you ask for a salary change first, have this agreed and then return to them several days later with another request the hiring manager will be less than impressed. However, if you make it clear that you have several things you’d like amending with your offer from the outset, you’ll ultimately make things easier for the other side.

The final step

Once the final contract has been drawn up and signed you might think that’s the end of the process. But it’s important to keep in contact with your new employer right up until the day you start. Chances are they’ll invite you in for a coffee or to a work social before you begin. But if they don’t, offer to go in for a pre-start chat. Not only will this show that you’re still keen (and possibly help you get that extra salary increase in a few months that you weren’t able to achieve at the negotiation stage) but it will also make your first day less daunting if you already know a few friendly faces/how to get into the office etc.

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